Pioneers of Hospice - Changing the Face of Dying
Changing the Face of Dying

The Kubler-Ross Model

The Kubler-Ross Model or the Five Stages of Grief is a model that was first introduced in the specialty literature by Dr. Kubler-Ross in her book called 'On Death and Dying' which was published in 1969. The book included this model plus a model referred to as the Model of Coping with Dying. She had established the five stages of grief model as a result of the findings of her research and interviews with more than 500 dying patients. The book described carefully and detailed all the processes through which people dying go. It comprises that ways in which people cope and then deal with grief and tragedy. The patients who she had interviewed were all diagnosed with illnesses in terminal stages or they were individuals who had experienced a catastrophic loss during their lifetime. Apart from developing one of what later became the most popular such model in the specialty, Dr. Kubler-Ross also brought mainstream awareness through her book on the extra sensitivity and care that is required when treating individuals who are dealing with a condition that will cost their lives. The five stages of grief is nowadays a widely accepted model of emotional and psychological responses that most individual tend to experience when faced with extreme situations. Later on, it has been concluded that the model may also be applied in cases in which the individuals did not have to cope with the thought of dying or with the death of a beloved one, but also in cases of divorce and even in the case of losing a job. It is important to bear in mind that the stages may not occur to everyone in the same chronological order and that some people might even skip certain stages. Coping with a life-changing event or situation is something that every individual does differently. There are also known cases of people who completely miss a stage and others who cannot pass from one of the stages. These stages are nowadays known under different names and they include the five stages of grief, the Kubler-Ross model, and the five stages of coping with grief, the five stages of coping with loss, and the five stages of loss and so on. The five stage of grief are abbreviated DABDA and they are denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. In the first stage, individuals usually experience this phase as a temporary defense. Anger is the second stage, the period when individuals realize that they can no longer deny their situation and replace those feelings with envy, rage and anger. Bargaining involves the hope that death can be postponed. Depression occurs as a result of the individual accepting the certainty of death and finally the acceptance stage when the patient comes to terms with death.

Pioneers of Hospice - Changing the Face of Dying

Expanded edition with new educational features